Hunting + Guides

The Pursuit of Happiness

It’s the Cowboy way of life to earn everything, so when you visit Campbell County to hunt in Northeast Wyoming, expect a challenge that will be well worth the trip. Wyoming’s wildlife famously outnumbers our residents, and this area has some of the highest densities of antelope anywhere. Robust pronghorn, whitetail and mule deer populations make the visit to Gillette and Wright its own trophy.

The pronghorn might be Campbell County’s unofficial mascot; just a quick drive at virtually anytime of year will show you why. With an estimated 40,000 to 50,000 pronghorn roaming the plains, it’s by far the most common large game animal, luckily for you. But even though they’re plentiful, that certainly doesn’t mean they’re an easy hunt. Pronghorns are the fastest animals in North America and second fastest in the world, capable of reaching 65 miles per hour and maintaining 40-50 MPH for several miles. Additionally, the species has remarkable eye sight and can recognize moving objects from great distances. If you’re visiting Campbell County to hunt, the pronghorn is your ultimate trophy. They’ll make you earn it, but that’s the Wyoming way.

Mule deer, with their distinct large ears and proficiency at camouflage, number around 30,000. They tend to occupy wooded or shrubby areas that feature broken terrain, and their tendency to bound rather than run suits rugged terrains like those of Wyoming. Whitetail deer, though less abundant than both pronghorn and mule deer, can be found across Campbell County — if you know where to look. The species tends to be shy and are seldom seen during the day unless they’re disturbed. Instead, they prefer to feed and move in the early morning, evening and night hours. Often your best chances for success is to put some miles on your boots. Leave the beaten path to find something that others have missed, and you’re often rewarded for the extra effort.

If you’re chasing a Super Slam, you’re familiar with all three of these big game animals which are required for the title, and you’re probably already familiar with Campbell County. So what are you waiting for? The chase starts now.

Out-of-state hunting application periods run January 1- May 31, and the draw happens in early June. The majority of land is privately owned, so we strongly advise that prospective hunters hire a guide for improved access as well as that invaluable insider expert eye on the area and game. We recommend first hiring an outfitter, then making a scout trip sometime over the summer before your hunt between September and November. While we’re lucky to have a sanctuary with more big game than people, you may want to consider planning your trip sometime during midseason when there’s less hunting pressure. Guides also tend to be more available during these slower times.

Remember that weather is unpredictable year-round in Wyoming, so if you’re coming in October, pack for 80 degrees and snow. Additionally, this is the wilderness, and fortunately your cell phone won’t have service in most places. Prepare accordingly.

Get more details including maps, hunting areas for different species and apply for licenses at https://wgfd.wyo.gov/.

To help ensure a successful hunt, hire a local Outfitter & Guide Service.